EP REVIEW: Lynks Afrikka creates a storm with their uncompromising EP “Smash Hits, Vol 1.”

Wednesday, August 12, 2020


Deodorant deity, antiperspirant perfect is how the gender-fuck drag artist Lynks Afrikka describe themselves and honestly it is incredibly accurate. Having already been tipped as one to watch by the Elton John it’s easy to see why this stellar performer has been causing quite the stir within the music industry and with the release of their debut EP I can only seem them creating a storm after this.

Smash Hits, Vol 1. is a collection tracks that are pulsating satirical pieces commenting about modern day life from the millennial perspective. The way to describe the sound is that it’s the house music we loved during the 90’s brought into the modern era with a contemporary flair that can only come from Afrikka’s sharply toned lyricisms.

Str8 Acting sets the tone for the EP with it effortlessly tackling the idolisation of straightness in the queer community as they explain, “There’s this total fetishisation of The Straight Man to the extent that every third Tinder or Grindr bio you scroll past will have ‘str8 acting looking for the same’ or some shit written in it.” How To Be Successful follows up with it commenting on the life that seems to be laid out in front of young people in a conveyor belt style where they’re expected to go to uni, get a job, get married and have a family. This whole piece is venting that frustration with a ferocity of aggression through expressive lyrics all done over a buoyant beat.

Rise + Shine feels like something a modern day Madness would produce with the comedic lyrics of the mundane routine we all go through each morning whilst simultaneously being commentary piece of our own mental health and how we all hate the morning. Desperately and Lovely, in Desperate Need of Love is the highlight of the EP for me, the pulsating rhythm, tongue in cheek lyrics and lustful nature of the whole piece is sheer perfection in my eyes and a track I desperately need to see performed live.

I Don’t Know What I want is an accurate depiction of the the millennial mind and how we genuinely have no clue what we want, whether it be in our career, life or general skills we want to develop. This ones a millennial anthem in the making. The EP ends with Pandemic and it’s an amusing commentary track on the way Britain reacted to the COVID-19 pandemic, including stocking up on beans.

Overall Lynks Afrikka is a Queer cult icon in the making and when this whole mess is over and done with their show is one of the first I’m going to see.

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